Remodeling, Donations, Chaos, and the Weekly Photo Challenge: Shadow

The painters are here – this one’s just a shadow shrouded behind a drape of plastic to keep out the dust. Things can get a little spooky looking when the light is just right…

Painter in the shadows, behind a plastic screenHere we are in daylight…

Painter in the shadows, behind a plastic screenAs you can see (off to the left) everything is piled up everywhere.

Here’s the kitchen last week when it was enshrouded too.  It’s pretty much cleaned up now, and a new fridge delivered too.

Kitchen under wraps - shrouded in plastic The old fridge, now donated, is currently for sale at the Fur Kids Thrift Store. It was working just fine, but updated for cosmetic purposes (hmm, now that I think of it, I could use a little updating for cosmetic purposes myself). Here it is taking its leave.

Old fridge loaded to Fur Kids truck

Out of the shadowy house and into the light — the old fridge gets loaded to the Fur Kids truck.  It’s too bad we can see one foot of the guy doing the loading — otherwise, it almost looks like it’s rolling itself out, leaning forward into a new life.

I’m delighted to have found the Fur Kids thrift store nearby. That makes two stores in this area that benefit animal rescue, Fur Kids and Rescued Too. They’re my new favorite places to take donations.

Fur Kids truck

I love the waving-kitty logo…

What’s your favorite place for donations?

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American Painting at the High Museum in Atlanta, just a little late for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Solitude

There’s a new exhibition opening at the High in Atlanta: Cross Country, the Power of Place in American Art 1915- 1950. Some of these mid-century works are so evocative of solitude that I had to do an extra post to share them. This one could have come straight out of my hometown…

George Ault - Bright Light at Russell's Corners, 1946

George Ault – Bright Light at Russell’s Corners, 1946

Artist John Rogers Cox is from Indiana, but this wheat field would seem familiar to most of us who grew up anywhere in the midwest– it’s the alien-looking cloud I’m worried about.

John Rogers Cox - Wheat Field - 1943

John Rogers Cox – Wheat Field – 1943

“A wheat field has a whispering sound and an awe-inspiring quality like deft music, like an ocean. It gives you a lonely feeling.”  John Rogers Cox in Life Magazine, 1948.

Are you feeling the solitude?

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Packing Up, Living Without Books, and the Weekly Photo Challenge: Solitude

I didn’t realize how lonely I’d be without books. Here’s my living room, with the once-messy shelves of books all packed away to keep or stacked to donate (except the Amazon-sale ones stashed away upstairs). I had to pack up for remodeling, so to keep from packing twice, the keepers will stay boxed up until time comes to move.

Living Room with empty book shelves and no paintings

Living room all packed up, with no books & no paintings

My “library” room — Sam calls it the MCM room since it’s more Mid-Century than the rest of the house — is bookless now too. Here it is in a state of packing up…

Packing up the books

What to keep and what to go?…

And here are some of the keeper boxes … what will I do while they are inaccessible?

Books to keep, all packed up

Some books to keep, ready to be packed away until I can move.

I’m accustomed to walking in any time and pulling out something to reference. It’s time to say ‘bye books, see you later. Just for now, I’ll have to cope with the solitude of booklessness (and be even more thankful for the Public Library).

Have you ever been bookless?

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Art Exhibitions, Found Objects, and the Weekly Photo Challenge: Repurpose

This is the kind of thing that makes it so hard for me to let things go.  If you have a lot of stuff, a project like these robots could be great fun. Instead of clearing up, I want to get sticky-fingered with every domino and tool and gear and key and blob and button I find.  These perky robot pals are from the gift shop at the American Folk Art Museum.

Robots, Museum of Folk Art, New York, NY

Robots,  don’t they look like they’re about to speak? — or pinch? American Folk Art Museum, New York, NY

Still in New York, at MOMA this time… at the 2016 Marcel Broodthayers Retrospective; this work is from a mixed-media room sized installation with the theme of “the relationship of war to comfort.”

Marcel Broodthayers, from Decor: a Conquest, mixed media, 1975.

Marcel Broodthayers, from Decor: a Conquest, mixed media, 1975.

Now if you’re downsizing, like me, something like this mobile might be a good way to repurpose your clothes hangars. Ready to clean out the closet? — make sculpture! And fabulous shadows play.

Man Ray. Obstruction, original 1920, Moderna Museet Edition, 1961 (13/15), Sixty Three Wood Coat Hangars

Man Ray. Obstruction, original 1920, Moderna Museet Edition, 1961 (13/15), Sixty Three Wood Coat Hangars

Got clogs? Here’s a musical instrument from Brussels…

Clog Fiddle - Jozef Laermans, Meerhout, Antwerp, 1969 (MIM: Musical Instruments Museum, Brussels Belgium)

Clog Fiddle – Jozef Laermans, Meerhout, Antwerp, 1969 (MIM: Musical Instruments Museum, Brussels Belgium)

And last, one from my own closet (recently donated to be repurposed by a quilting friend). Repurposing a quilt should get double points, since quilts are repurposed anyway. This was a flea-market find from years ago… (hard to let it go).

Crazy Quilt

Crazy Quilt – repurposing fabric scraps, corduroy and velveteen.

Do you have potential art materials in your closet?

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