“The Pursuit of Everything – Maira Kalman’s Books for Children” at the High Museum Atlanta (CFFC 5+ Things)

There really is “everything” to see at the Maira Kalman exhibit at the High Museum. First up: Illustrations from her books for children — on view through September 15 2019.

Maira Kalman (American, born Israel, 1949), Illustration of Sojourner Truth for Bold & Brave: Ten Heroes Who Won Women the Right to Vote, written by Kirsten Gillibrand (Alfred A. Knopf, 2018). Brooklyn Museum, gift of the artist and Julie Saul Gallery, New York. © 2018 Maira Kalman, courtesy of Julie Saul Gallery, New York. All rights reserved.

Sojourner Truth — Maira Kalman, Illustration for Bold and Brave: Ten Heroes Who Won Women the Right to Vote by Kirsten Gillibrand (Alfred A. Knopf). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the artist and Julie Saul Gallery, New York. © 2018 Maira Kalman.

It’s beautifully presented —

Max in Paris - illustrations and wall text. High Museum of Art - Atlanta GA

Text and pictures from ‘Max in Paris’ …

Beyond wall art… she didn’t just write and illustrate a book on Cake. She acknowledges the importance of celebratory moments, and yes, cake is often involved.

A cake is a good thing to sit on - Maira Kalman exhibition, High Museum Atlanta

Lots of fun with the presentation – By all means, do sit on the cake.

Watch out for monsters…

Curator Jane Curley, Maira Kalman exhibition at the High Museum Atlanta

Curator Jane Curley, posing with the big green guy.

From the studio exhibit in Maira Kalman, The Pursuit of Everything, at the High Museum Atlanta

Here’s a treat — selections from the wall behind the workspace in her studio – objects that inspire her and appear in her work.

If you’ve read this blog before you may know I’m always interested in shoes as objets d’art — did I get that right? I may not have got very far in French class yet but I’m as enthusiastic as Max in Paris.

"The Shoes that Slow Down Time" from the studio exhibit in Maira Kalman, The Pursuit of Everything, at the High Museum Atlanta

The Shoes that Slow Down Time: she said she loved them but they’re too big, and it’s hard to go very fast in shoes that are too big. So – they slow down time.

"Kindly do not step on the ladders" from the studio exhibit in Maira Kalman, The Pursuit of Everything, at the High Museum Atlanta

Yes! More shoes.

More paintings —

Maira Kalman (American, born Israel, 1949), “He had a family that he loved very much,” 2012, illustration for Looking at Lincoln (Nancy Paulsen Books, 2012), gouache on paper, 15 1/8 x 22 inches. © Maira Kalman, courtesy of Julie Saul Gallery, New York. All rights reserved.

Maira Kalman (American, born Israel, 1949), “He had a family that he loved very much,” 2012, illustration for Looking at Lincoln (Nancy Paulsen Books, 2012), gouache on paper, 15 1/8 x 22 inches. © Maira Kalman, courtesy of Julie Saul Gallery, New York. All rights reserved.

If you love humor and whimsey and wordplay, this exhibition is for you. Maira Kalman’s work encompasses cover illustrations for the New Yorker, books for adults, books for children as well as dance, music, and theater collaborations.

And if you love dogs, this exhibition is definitely for you.  Did you see the dog at Lincoln’s table? One more thing:

Dogs: All Beloved, Maira Kalman: The Pursuit of Everything - at the High Museum Atlanta Jul 2019

From Pete to Max and every dog between … “All Beloved”

Oh, and one more “one more thing” — the illustration from  Bold & Brave: Ten Heroes Who Won Women the Right to Vote, written by Kirsten Gillibrand, art by Maira Kalman, photo provided by the High Museum —

Maira Kalman (American, born Israel, 1949), “Inez Milholland, 1886–1916,” 2018, illustration for Bold & Brave: Ten Heroes Who Won Women the Right to Vote, written by Kirsten Gillibrand (Alfred A. Knopf, 2018), gouache on paper, 14 1/8 x 11 1/8 inches. © Maira Kalman, courtesy of Julie Saul Gallery, New York. All rights reserved.

Maira Kalman (American, born Israel, 1949), “Inez Milholland, 1886–1916,” 2018, illustration for Bold & Brave: Ten Heroes Who Won Women the Right to Vote, written by Kirsten Gillibrand (Alfred A. Knopf, 2018), gouache on paper, 14 1/8 x 11 1/8 inches. © Maira Kalman, courtesy of Julie Saul Gallery, New York. All rights reserved.

The Pursuit of Everything: Maira Kalman’s Books for Children- at the High Museum Atlanta through Sept 15 2019

More on Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: 5+ Items

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10 thoughts on ““The Pursuit of Everything – Maira Kalman’s Books for Children” at the High Museum Atlanta (CFFC 5+ Things)

  1. This sounds like a well-rounded curated exhibit. Seems like it shows us Maira’s work and a bit about her life. Really like how there is cake and a life-sized dino – bringing her interests and aesthetics to life. Sort of like walking through someone else’s life.

    • Thanks for commenting Mabel – I was so excited about the exhibit because she was there for the preview. We all loved her droll sense of humor. (I went to see the theater version of Max Makes a Million twice) And of course cake is always of interest!

      • It’s always a treat when the author or performer is there for the exhibit, up close and personal. Also sounds like it wasn’t that crowded so you could probably ask her a question or two 🙂

      • Yes, and also tell her how much we appreciated her humor and her art. It was surprisingly uncrowded. Meanwhile, I have been thinking of you enjoying winter while we slog through our hot-hotter-hottest summer days.

      • Hope you get to visit more exhibits soon. I would rather have a hot summer day over a mild winter day any day. So over winter, but it means summer is up ahead. Stay cool, Sandy 🙂

      • Funny how we both want each other’s seasons! It’s just hard to do much outside activity when it’s so hot and bright (waiting until sundown to take a walk). I shouldn’t complain, will be cold soon enough.

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